Healing Suppressed Emotions


 

Healing Suppressed Emotions
 → Facing and Releasing Fear
emotional health and healing
 

 
The Art of Transformation in  Moving from Pain to Healing

   

Emotions control your thinking, behavior and actions. Emotions affect your physical bodies as much as your body affects your feelings and thinking. People who ignore, dismiss, repress or just ventilate their emotions, are setting themselves up for physical illness.
Emotions are energy in motion and look like clouds hovering above and around our physical body.  High frequency emotions such as love and joy look bright while lower frequency emotions look dimmer and dark.

Negative or lower frequency emotions can have a detrimental effect on our physical body over time.  These emotions eventually can become toxins at the cellular level and can damage body tissues and even become serious dis-eases.
Emotions store in the body in layers on top of layers and these can affect our mood, attitude and personality in their degree of concentration. 

 

 

When we truly heal a painful experience, you just do not feel the same way about it today as you did then.  You no longer feel the sadness, angry, bitterness, jealousy or whatever feelings it once caused. On the other hand, if your situation was just so emotional that you simply couldn’t face it or did not have the skills/support to deal with it, you may have just tried to ignore it, stuff it down, bottle it up and move on. This is what is known as repression. Repression occurs when an emotion is so strong that the person’s psyche completely “hides it” from their consciousness. It is not forgotten but instead is totally hidden from their conscious awareness. All those emotions stay with them, buried deep, never again to be talked about or addressed as if it never happened. This inevitably can cause anxiety, phobias, depression and an overall dis-ease of the body, mind or soul.


How do you know if you have healed the pain from a past trauma? 


Take a moment to sit back, relax and focus a few moments on your breath. Then, as vividly as possible, recall a particularly difficult situation from your past. Try and remember it all, every detail as much as possible. Once you have it in your mind, bring your awareness to your heart. Notice how you feel when you recall it. See if you can identify where those feelings stored in your body?  If it has been healed, you cannot and will not feel those unpleasant feelings that you once felt. If not, you will still feel residual effects to whatever degree it has not been fully released. If that’s the case, it’s ok. Awareness is obviously a huge part of the healing process. But remember, once you truly face it, grieve it, resolve it, and release it, it will never bother you again. Something that was traumatic, emotional, frightening, sad or painful in any way will not have the emotional ties on you once it has been healed.


Fortunately today there are many ways available to heal and cleanse the emotional wounds from the past. Homeopathy, regression therapy, EFT (emotional freedom technique), shadow work, medicine plants, yoga, acupuncture, breath work, body and energy work, psychic healing, hypnotherapy, psychotherapy and traditional counseling can all assist in removing these emotional toxins that potentially wreak havoc in our lives.

We are all being operated to a large extent by the programming of our subconscious minds. For this reason, one of the most powerful ways to make permanent changes in our life is to pull the weeds (heal emotional wounds) and plant new seeds (beliefs) so we may harvest new fruits on our tree of life.


The word "emotion" stands for energy in motion. Our feelings produce energy that needs to "move" or be expressed in a healthy way. If not, that energy builds up and cannot be contained. It will release itself in your body in the form of chronic pain, headaches, stomach upset, sleep disruption, sore throats, and tight muscles. Or, it will explode in the form of damaging words. You can try to suppress emotions by "ignoring" them through distractions: alcohol, drugs, medication, work, relationships, gambling, TV, or Internet addiction. It won't work. You're fighting against a natural law: energy moves.


People sometime think that they are good at handling their emotions because they have become good at suppressing them. But emotional suppression is not emotional competence… far from it.

Many diseases have been found to have a psychological component. Sometimes illness is the direct result of past trauma and emotions stored in the body. Sometimes illness is the only way a repressed emotion can exercise its need for attention. With hypnotherapy we can search for the underlying cause of illness. We can use regression therapy to clear emotions and trauma that could be causing the illness. We also use energy work and guides to help us with the healing process. 


         


Every situation in life that produces an emotional reaction has two basic components to it. There is the situation itself and there is our reaction to the situation. When the situation is over it is typically over and long gone. But our reaction is the part of the situation that lives on, sometimes for a very long time.

The roots of not being emotionally competent begin in early childhood. Most people become deeply habituated to suppress their emotions or be swept away by them into emotional reactivity as a consequence of a seemingly universal experience from early childhood. That universal experience is getting emotionally overwhelmed. It seems to happen to everyone. And I’ve yet to meet anyone who liked it. We dislike the experience of emotional overwhelm so much that we do everything possible to avoid the experience of intense emotions, especially if they are painful, which they often are.


As a result of getting emotionally overwhelmed we react in one of two ways:


We attempt to avoid experiencing the sensation of the emotion in our body. Especially if the feeling is intense – we do our best not to feel it. This is emotional suppression and most people become quite good at doing this. We collapse into the emotion and get swept away by it. We cry or get angry or feel anxious or depressed and we seem to be consumed by the emotion. Most people are also quite good at doing this. 

Because these experiences of feeling avoidance and being swept away into reactivity happen a lot when we are little, we get deeply conditioned to respond to emotions in these two fundamental ways. Some people are much more suppressive and others are much more cathartic or reactive but we tend to be skilled at both of these emotional responses.


Instead of suppressing an emotional energy and adding another incomplete experience to our database of old unresolved emotional pain, we need to learn how to stay present to the sensation. In fact we need to learn how to bring our awareness closer to it rather than go away from it. Getting closer to the emotional energy doesn’t sound like such a good idea to the deeply conditioned part of us that is used to emotional suppression. That’s been the only way we have known how to deal with them. But what we find if we bring our awareness closer to the sensation is that indeed there is a field of energy there. And in the energy field there is an area within it that seems more condensed, more intense than elsewhere. This more intense area is usually toward the center of the energy field.

Although the conditioning of emotional suppression is wide spread and most people are so good at doing it that they aren’t even aware that they are doing, with just a little guidance you can become quite skilled at doing the opposite of what you are deeply conditioned to do. After all the fear of being emotionally overwhelmed that is driving the habit of emotional suppression is really based on the perspective of a very young child. Most people have a three your old running their emotional life and they are not aware that this is so.


How We Repress or Suppress Emotions


When we have an experience that we find painful or difficult, and are either unable to cope with the pain, or just afraid of it, we often dismiss this emotion and either get busy, exercise more, drink or eat a bit more, or just pretend it has not happened. When we do this we do not feel the emotion and this results in what is called repressed, suppressed or buried emotions. These feelings stay in our muscles, ligaments, stomach, midriff, and auras. These emotions remain buried within us until we bring that emotion up and feel the emotion, thus releasing it. Emotions that are buried on the long-term are the emotions that normally cause physical illness.

 

   HOW BIG IS YOUR SACK OF EMOTIONAL PAIN?

grief - anxiety - depression - sadness - self-pity - bad luck - unfulfilled dreams - shame - humiliation -

unhappy relationships - betrayal - regret - loneliness - low confidence - guilt - frustration -feelings held back

"A teacher once asked her students to each bring to school a sack of potatoes. For every painful experience they could recall, and for every person they could not forgive in their life, each student had to choose a potato and then carve into it the name of the incident and the date of the occurrence

For an entire month the students were required to carry around their personalized sack of potatoes at all times.  It lay beside their bed at night, sat with them at lunch and on the bus, and while they were with friends.


The hassle of lugging around this load soon made it profoundly clear what a weight they were carrying around emotionally.  The people whose names were inscribed on the potatoes were not in the least affected by the heavy .

It seemed a rather high price to pay to hold onto people, situations and emotions that were of no positive value in their lives. The students began to see forgiveness and letting go as a gift to themselves, rather than a gift to others".


We all carry emotional baggage to varying degrees - painful childhood memories, grief over the loss of a loved one, the devastation of a marriage or relationship break up, the trauma of physical or sexual violation.  Who hasn't suffered rejection, betrayal, hardship, failure, shame, longing, guilt, loss of self-esteem, or sorrow to some degree? 

It's easier to believe there is a way around experiencing sorrow, that we can avoid pain and lose nothing of the fullness and joy of living. What I have come to realize is that it is not pain that hurts us most. It is resistance to pain that wears us out.  We fear it, fight it, run from it, ignore it or try to bury it.


It takes a lot more energy to store pain than it does to confront it. The tension and effort of bracing shut the doors of our emotional storage vault eventually takes its toll in physical terms . It's no wonder so many people feel tired, listless, and in pain all the time.  Sadly, when you live with low energy long enough, it begins to feel normal and you lose the memory of how to feel great.


There’s a luggage limit to every passenger on a flight. The same rules apply to your life. You must eliminate some baggage before you can fly. ~Rosalind Johnson

Read more about letting go of emotional baggage: letting go

 

        


Powerful emotions such as pain, fear, grief, disappointment, panic, anxiety, anger, and longing, shock your body like an electrical charge, leaving scars or lesions along your neural pathways.  This disrupts your body's natural energy flow.

"While there are a variety of things that are thought to cause cancer, I believe firmly that trapped emotions are a contributing factor to the disease process, as I believe they are to many, if not most other diseases. Every cancer patient I treated was found to have trapped emotions embedded in the malignant tissues. ...
... trapped emotions are, in my opinion, an underlying cause of cancer. It is vital that these trapped emotions be removed. Even though they may have already contributed to the cancer, once removed, they cannot cause any further damage in the years to come."
Dr. Bradley Nelson in his book “The Emotion Code” (June 2007)
 



 

Bottling up or suppressing emotion is a bitter-sweet thing. It can help or severely hurt you. In most cases, it hurts.

When the emotions are suppressed the intense negative feeling goes away, but the emotion gets pushed into the subconscious, where it simply sits there and waits, until another unpleasant experience triggers it.

When the new unpleasant experience triggers it, that reminds the emotions of the original unpleasant experience, those same intense emotions resurface. Then the person pushes them down again into the subconscious, because the person feels uncomfortable with the intense feeling. This happens continuously over a period of years, and eventually the person stops feeling, or only feels one core emotion " sadness" because they keep suppressing their original feelings.  
 


People bottle up emotion for numerous reasons; whether be it they can’t fight back due to the situation, for example, your boss or teacher is giving you a rough time about something, you can’t fight back against them. Some people think that if they show emotion, others will think they’re weak. Some just flat out worry about what everyone will think. Others think they should feel a certain way and make themselves appear to be that way to be ‘normal’. One may go through a traumatic event that can trigger it, they go into shock and don’t know how to deal with what they are or aren’t feeling. They may not want to bother other with their issues, or don’t want to tell anyone because ‘they wont understand’. And some just simply do it to not hurt.


One reason we have trouble feeling our pain and expressing it to others is that we feel a loss of self-esteem in doing so. This is because many of us have bought into false notions about what it means to be a healthy or strong person. They myth of the hero is a predominant one in our society. Its basic premise is that negative feelings and pain are a sign of weakness. And that keeping a "stiff upper lip" and "toughing it out" are signs of maturity, character and strength.

This notion is nonsense. Nature seems to be arguing that nothing could be further from the truth. The myth of the hero is a fiction that can be very dangerous if taken literally. Optimal levels of health and real strength and character demand that we simply accept what's going on in our own psychology. It takes a lot of moral courage, as well as friendship and generosity toward ourselves, to be with the truth of what we are feeling.

Too often, we feel shame or a loss of pride if we feel, for example, sad, depressed, lonely or frightened. Those of us who deny or avoid any negative feelings at all seem to be the most likely to become ill. If we can learn how to be open to what we are feeling and to express it to someone we trust, without undo fear or threat, then we will not only be better able to avoid illness, but we'll also be a lot happier.


    


If feeling and expressing our distress were taboo in our family of origin, we can have a difficult time in being open to what we are feeling. Unfortunately, we all tend to internalize the rules that were part of our childhood family systems.

These family "rules and programmes" seem to have a life of their own and although appropriate to our past, they can create trouble for us in the present. It takes effort to become free from these family programmes. But it is an effort worth making. We now know that illnesses that tend to run in families are not just caused by an inherited biological predisposition to a particular disease. Family-linked illnesses can be related to a shared style of handling emotional pain and distress through denial and avoidance. If this is the case for us, then it is important that we try not to pass this style along to our children.

Although it is difficult to change our ways of handling what we feel, it can be done. Like anything else, we have to learn exactly how to be more open, and then we have to put what we learn to good use. Emotional openness can become a natural part of who we are, and we can live a lot better and longer as a result.

 

  • They are unable to fight back in an argument situation (eg the "opponent" is more dominant or it is someone of authority that it may impact their employment).

  • They think that if they show their emotions it is a sign of weakness.

  • They believe it is not normal to be feeling a certain way, so try to conceal their emotions from others.

  • They are afraid of what other people might think.
  • They feel that they have to deal with their emotions or problems on their own because "no one else will understand".

  • A situation may have occurred that has placed someone in shock and they just don't know how to deal with it or they just block it out because don't fully understand it makes them feel (or don't feel) a certain way.

  • They feel they have to be "the rock" for others.

  • They don't want to be hurt so they swallow their emotions back down.

 

 
Emotions repressed for the long-term may cause serious illness including cancer, arthritis, chronic fatigue, and many other major health problems.
 
When you have repressed emotions, your behavior and reactions to events in the present moment are mostly reactions to past events as well as the present. This has a negative effect on all relationships in your life. You cannot be fully present with those you love in today until you have released your emotions from the past. You buried emotions because they were too painful and difficult to deal with when they occurred and this pain affects your reactions to today’s events and hurt that remains buried in your body. 
 

 
             

Emotions are reliable indicators of what is really going on inside of us. There are many ways to identify emotions and you will have to choose the manner that is most suitable to your personality. Some people need to do this in solitude whereas some people need to do this with others. Some will want to write while others will use a much more casual approach. Sometimes it’s best to combine a number of approaches for a deeper identification of emotions.

The following are a few examples of the methods people use to avoid feeling their emotions.

  • Ignoring your feelings

  • Pretending something hasn’t happened

  • Overeating

  • Eating foods loaded with sugar and fat

  • Excessive drinking of alcohol

  • Excessive use of recreational drugs

  • Using prescription drugs such as tranquilizers or Prozac

  • Exercising compulsively

  • Any type of compulsive behavior

  • Excessive sex with or without a partner

  • Always keeping busy so you can’t feel

  • Constant intellectualizing and analyzing

  • Excessive reading or TV

  • Working Excessively

  • Keeping conversations superficial

  • Burying angry emotions under the mask of peace and love

 

 
Physical Effects of Emotions

Emotions have a direct effect on how our bodies work. Fear-based emotions stimulate the release of one set of chemicals while love-based emotions release a different set of chemicals. If the fear-based emotions are long-term or chronic they damage the chemical systems, the immune system, the endocrine system and every other system in your body. Our immune systems weaken and many serious illnesses set in. This relationship between emotions, thinking, and the body is being called Mind/Body Medicine today.
 

When we have an experience that we find painful or difficult, and are either unable to cope with the pain, or just afraid of it, we often dismiss this emotion and either get busy, exercise more, drink or eat a bit more, or just pretend it has not happened. When we do this we do not feel the emotion and this results in what is called repressed, suppressed or buried emotions. These feelings stay in our muscles, ligaments, stomach, midriff, auras. These emotions remain buried within us until we bring that emotion up and feel the emotion, thus releasing it. Emotions that are buried on the long - term are the emotions that normally cause physical illness. They affect all your relationships, and they especially affect your ability to grow spiritually and shift your level of consciousness.
 

                 


           


 
Emotions repressed for the long-term may cause serious illness including cancer, arthritis, chronic fatigue, and many other major health problems.
 
  • Fatigue

  • Depression without an apparent cause

  • Speaking of issues/interests rather than personal matters  and feelings

  • Pretending something doesn’t matter when inside it does matter.

  • Rarely talking about your feelings.

  • Blowing up over minor incidents

  • Walking around with a knot in your stomach or tightness in your throat.

  • Feeling your anger not at the time something happens but a few days later.

  • In relationships, focusing discussions on children/ money rather than talking about yourselves.

  • Difficulty talking about yourself.

  • Troubled personal relationships with family, friends, acquaintances.

  • A lack of ambition or motivation

  • Lethargic – who cares - attitude

  • Difficulty accepting yourself and others

  • Laughing on the outside while crying on the inside

 

       


Once you've suppressed emotion for a long enough time, you become crabby and may snap at people for no reason. You're more likely to explode on people, most likely friends and loved ones. You end up using short-term solutions like drugs and alcohol. You become numb, lost and depressed and are more likely to commit suicide if you feel there’s no way out of it. These emotions can manifest physically and make you ill.

Repressed or buried emotions can cause major difficulties in the physical body and energetic systems. They affect all your relationships, and they especially affect your ability to grow spiritually and shift your level of consciousness. 


Emotions repressed for the long-term can cause serious illness including cancer, arthritis, chronic fatigue, and many other major health problems. Since repressed emotions can rest either in your body or auras, they can cause holes in your auras, through which your energy leaks out creating fatigue, a sense of vulnerability, and low self-confidence.

When you have repressed emotions, your behavior and reactions to events in the present moment are often reactions to past events as well as the present. This has a negative effect on all relationships in your life. 

You cannot be fully present with those you love in today until you have released your emotions from the past.  You buried emotions because they were too painful and difficult to deal with when they occurred and this pain affects your reactions to today’s events and hurt that remains buried in your body.


It takes a lot of energy to bury emotions and to keep them buried.


There isn’t much energy left over for other activities when your energy is being used to keep stuffing these emotions back down. By nature, buried emotions want to come up so you can become aware of them, feel them and release them. You work very hard to keep them stuffed down. Our real purpose in being on Mother Earth is to keep increasing our level of consciousness and living a more spiritual or love-based life. The higher the consciousness someone has, the higher degree of spirituality in his or her life. The higher the spirituality the closer we are to being what we are meant to be, a fully integrated and loving human being. You cannot shift to higher levels of consciousness as long as you have major negative emotions buried within you. 


Poor emotional health can weaken your body's immune system, making you more likely to get colds and other infections during emotionally difficult times. Also, when you are feeling stressed, anxious or upset, you may not take care of your health as well as you should. You may not feel like exercising, eating nutritious foods or taking medicine that your doctor prescribes. Abuse of alcohol, tobacco or other drugs may also be a sign of poor emotional health.

Emotions repressed for the long-term can cause serious illness including cancer, arthritis, chronic fatigue, and many other major health problems. Your energy leaks out creating fatigue, a sense of vulnerability, and low self-confidence.


When you have repressed emotions, your behavior and reactions to events in the present moment are often reactions to past events as well as the present. This has a negative effect on all relationships in your life. 

You cannot be fully present with those you love in today until you have released your emotions from the past.  You buried emotions because they were too painful and difficult to deal with when they occurred and this pain affects your reactions to today’s events and hurt that remains buried in your body.


          


When we have unmet emotional needs, we often seek physical substitutes.


Try to identify the times when your excessive behavior was triggered and, as soon as you can, identify the emotion that is causing this behavior. It can be stress or fear related to a new job, the death of a friend or partner, difficulties with lovers or children. Document these emotions as best as you can. We never do anything without getting something from it. There is a reason why you are engaged in excessive or compulsive behavior.


Eating, Drinking, Exercising, or Any Type of Compulsive or Excessive Behavior: 

We often go for weeks, even years acting in a manner that is normal for us – and what is normal for you may not be normal for another person. Then we will find ourselves overeating, working excessively, drinking daily, engaging in compulsive sex, working long hours, and many other types of compulsive behavior. We stuff down our feelings through excessive behavior, ensuring we do not feel them at that moment. We do this because the feelings are too painful or we are just too afraid of these feelings and where they might lead us in our thinking and actions.


Some Ways We Try to Compensate for Our Unmet Emotional Needs.


  • By managing/controlling/manipulating others
  • By feeling superior to them.
  • By seeking status, money, fame.
  • By competing and trying to be the fastest, the smartest, the best, etc.

All of these are attempts at making it appear that we are okay, that we are worthy. These fill some of our needs, but neglect many others. When we are behaving in ways that don't address all or enough of our emotional needs, this behavior is ultimately unhealthy for us. Often instead of realizing that we have other unmet needs, we try to compensate for what is missing by seeking more of what we already have enough of. Some needs then become a substitute for the others. But we can never get enough of the substitutes, so we never truly feel emotionally fulfilled.



Men and women go through many situations telling themselves that “it doesn’t really matter” or “it’s not important enough to argue about”, basically buying peace by agreeing to something that deep down they do not agree with. They find themselves feeling unhappy, disgruntled, and angry with the individual involved.  This type of situation creates tensions and unhappiness in relationships.  Buying peace at any price creates negative feelings within you. 

Identify those situations where you have created depressing feelings within yourself by agreeing to something that makes you don’t really agree with. Write them down. This will be difficult for people who have difficulty saying no, or who are too anxious to please others. But the feelings generated by these situations are very important when dealing with your emotional life.  Many times we need to excuse things and just overlook them. That’s normal in life. But we apply this to situations that affect us deeply. It’s these situations we need to identify.


Deciding How To Respond To Your Emotions: 


Once you have identified a certain emotion you will at times need to decide how to precede in dealing with it.  There are many options that need to be considered carefully. Certain approaches can have very serious effects. You could lose your job, or you could lose your marriage. It’s very important to consider your options carefully before saying or doing something that cannot be taken back.

The following are a few questions you can ask yourself when deciding what response would suit a particular situation best – and each emotion, each situation is different. 

 
  • Am I reacting to this situation or is this reaction partially a reaction to a past situation as well? 
  • Am I able to discuss the issues with the person without venting anger? 
  • Will I be able to talk about how I feel to the person? 
  • Is a direct approach the best way to proceed? 
  • What are the consequences of dealing directly with the person/ situation? 
  • What do I expect from this discussion?  *Are my expectations realistic? 
  • Should I discuss this with someone before doing anything?
  • By asking these questions you will be deciding whether a direct approach is the best approach, and if so if you are ready do this at the present time. If your anger is at a “rage” stage, you need to release some of this anger before proceeding to discuss this with anyone.

          

        


People who make a deep commitment to themselves to become emotionally healthy are willing to go to great lengths to learn about their emotional selves and to do what is required to release buried emotions. This is often an uncomfortable and difficult journey when you begin, but I promise you great joy once you’ve gotten over the first few hurdles. Once you make this commitment your journey to identify your issues and release buried emotions will become much easier.


When the emotions are suppressed the intense negative feeling goes away, but the emotion gets pushed into the subconscious, where it simply sits there and waits, until another unpleasant experience triggers it.

When the new unpleasant experience triggers it, that reminds the emotions of the original unpleasant experience, those same intense emotions resurface. Then the person pushes them down again into the subconscious, because the person feels uncomfortable with the intense feeling. This happens continuously over a period of years, and eventually the person stops feeling, or only feels one core emotion " sadness" because they keep suppressing their original feelings.

 


In order to incorporate more positive things into my life, I realize I must give up some negative habits, perspectives, and attitudes:

 • In order to become more optimistic, I need to get over this one habit:



 • In order to become more hopeful, I need to overcome this one perspective:



 • In order to become more joyful, I need to give up this one attitude:



 • I want to become more optimistic in my life because…



 • I want to be more hopeful in my life because…



 • I want to be more joyful in my life because…



 • In order to be more optimistic, I will do the following:

1.__________________________________________


2.__________________________________________


3.__________________________________________


 • In order to be more hopeful, I will do the following:

1.__________________________________________


2.__________________________________________


3.__________________________________________


 • In order to be more joyful, I will do the following:

1.__________________________________________


2.__________________________________________


3.__________________________________________
 

 
Go to the  Toolkit for healing where
You can find some inspiration for  releasing your emotion
 

  

Your mental and emotional health has been and will continue to be shaped by your experiences. Early childhood experiences are especially significant. Genetic and biological factors can also play a role, but these too can be changed by experience.  

Risk factors that can compromise mental and emotional health:


Poor connection or attachment to your primary caretaker early in life.


Feeling lonely, isolated, unsafe, confused, or abused as an infant or young child.


Traumas or serious losses, especially early in life.  Death of a parent or other traumatic experiences such as war or hospitalization.


Learned helplessness.


Negative experiences that lead to a belief that you’re helpless and that you have little control over the situations in your life.


Side effects of medications, especially in older people who may be taking a variety of medications.


Substance abuse.

Alcohol and drug abuse can both cause mental health problems and make preexisting mental or emotional problems worse.


Whatever internal or external factors have shaped your mental and emotional health, it’s never too late to make changes that will improve your psychological well-being. Risk factors can be counteracted with protective factors, like strong relationships, a healthy lifestyle, and coping strategies for managing stress and negative emotions.


When to seek professional help for emotional problems.


If you’ve made consistent efforts to improve your mental and emotional health and you still don’t feel good – then it’s time to seek professional help. Because we are so socially attuned, input from a knowledgeable, caring professional can motivate us to do things for ourselves that we were not able to do on our own.


Red flag feelings and behaviors that may require immediate attention


  • Inability to sleep.

  • Feeling down, hopeless, or helpless most of the time.

  • Concentration problems that are interfering with your work or home life.

  • Using nicotine, food, drugs, or alcohol to cope with difficult emotions.

  • Negative or self-destructive thoughts or fears that you can’t control.

  • Thoughts of death or suicide.


       

 
Shifting Your Perspective: 

Life brings injustice, abuse, bad luck, and emotions of hurt, anger, self-pity, and depression. It’s quite easy to look at what others have done that you consider being wrong, and these wrongs are very real. It’s not as easy to look at your response to the real wrong or injustice done to you. Someone might have demeaned you and degraded you.

Did you punish them in some manner for their behaviour? Was your response to the situation a healthy and loving response?

Emotions around injustice of any kind are complex. Once we accept personal responsibility for our responses, the emotions around a given situation tend to lose their hold over us. It’s important to honor that an injustice has occurred. But it’s equally important to be ready to release that from your life, which involves looking at your own behavior, and accepting responsibility for your own actions.


Detach Yourself: 


When your emotions are running high and you are having difficult reducing the intensity, try to detach yourself from the situation and the emotion. Try to imagine the same situation happening to someone else.  Try to see if the behavior would be the same if someone else were in your situation. If the answer is yes then you can begin to see that the experience is not necessarily being focused at you. The other person is probably acting unconsciously, and you just happen to be the individual “in their way”. Detaching yourself in this manner can help you move through very difficult situations without taking the abuse personally. You might need to terminate the situation causing the emotions, but your detachment allows you to look at things more rationally and quietly.

 


  Facing and Releasing Fear

emotional health and healing

 


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